Lush Bee’s

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Are Vegan’s happy to buy Lush Bee related products?

 

I recently attended a blogging event at the Lush store in Liverpool, it was a great night and the Lush staff are fantastic hosts. The event was aimed at promoting the upcoming festive season and next week after halloween I will publish a blog post with some festive gift buying inspiration. First though I want to share an interesting conversation I had with one of the skin expert staff members regarding the ingredients of honey and beeswax in their products. The lady I was speaking with wanted to make it completely clear that Lush source all of their animal derived products from the most ethical of suppliers and that one of her colleagues who is also a Vegan, was initially not happy to use any products that contained the ingredients honey, beeswax or egg’s but after learning more about where the ingredients came from felt confident enough that he wasn’t buying into cruelty.

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Many people often ask why honey and beeswax aren’t considered Vegan? 

Well a Vegan by definition is a person who refrains from using any kind of animal products or by products, in food, beauty products, clothing and for any other day to day purpose.

There are however many reasons as to why people these days are adopting a Vegan lifestyle. Some people are Vegan for the animals, some go Vegan for the environment and there are others that become plant based vegan for their health.

My personal motivation is for the animals and I want to ensure that I am not unconsciously buying into cruelty whenever I make a purchase.

Another question people often have is “what’s so cruel about using bee derived products”? 

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Sadly in any industry where there is profit to be made ethics are rarely considered.

No exception spared for the bee whose survival is integral to our very own survival and the survival of our Earth as we know it.

In manufactured Bee Keeping the Queen often has one of her wings cut or painted with nail varnish to stop them from leaving the hive and flying away, this also prevents swarming.

The culling of drone bees (male bees who don’t contribute to the production of honey).

Bee’s produce honey to feed the hive, many hives have been completely wiped out due to starvation over the winter months as a result of too much honey being removed from the hive and not leaving enough for the Bee’s to survive.

Many Bee’s are also killed during the process of obtaining honey from the hive.

 

That said I do believe that there are independent BeeKeepers who keep Bee’s ethically and do what they can to help increase their ever depleting numbers.

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(Pictured above) David is one of the Lush Bee related product suppliers, this is his take on ethical bee keeping.

https://uk.lush.com/article/sticky-profession

To summarise:

David prefers a hands off approach and does not cut the Queen Bee’s wing, or cull male drone bees. His hives are bigger than standard hives to minimise stress to the bees. He will not intervene with a hive unless he feels that the colony is struggling to survive. Over winter he leaves them with enough honey to sustain them, again only intervening in feeding them if there is a delayed summer.

There is no doubt that the reason why honey is used in so many beauty products is due to its incredible beneficial properties.

Of course there are other products out there that can substitute both honey and beeswax but none quite match their almost magic like qualities. So in some way it is understandable that beauty and cosmetic companies still use bee produce. In fact the usage of Bee related products dates as far back as ancient Egypt.

Going back to my original question “are Vegan’s happy to use Bee related products”?

I feel Lush genuinely aims to be ethical and profitable as possible, they have a reputation for being a great employer and generally seeking to have the best practises for animals, the environment and people. It’s easy to see this is why many Vegan’s love Lush, especially considering that they label their Vegan products and approximately 70% of their products are Vegan friendly.

As a Vegan I believe nature shouldn’t need human intervention, still I wonder have humans interfered so much with nature to the detriment of Bee’s and now like many other species they require our help for survival.

Considering this should it be necessary that we continue to take from them in order to care for them when our own survival is very much intertwined.

I would love to hear other people’s thoughts and knowledge on this topic so please feel free to leave a comment below and start a conversation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Labelling

 

 

Vegan Vs Cruelty Free

Are Vegan products necessarily Cruelty Free?

No but they  probably should be…..

Products can be labelled Vegan and still be tested on animals, which I guess kinda goes against the whole point of being Vegan.

Recently some make-up companies have responded to the rising Vegan movement by labelling their products Vegan when they don’t contain any animal derived ingredients yet they will still allow for their products to be tested on when sold to mainland China.

In china it is mandatory for cosmetics to be tested on animals.

Are Cruelty Free products always Vegan?

Cruelty free labelling just means that a product has not been tested on animals.

Here are some examples of labels that you can trust.

 

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It is worth noting that not all cruelty free / vegan brands use these labels and the reason for this is because there is application process and a charge to be registered with these organisations.

Lush have created their own label 

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Other companies such as Bayliss and Harding have created their own Cruelty Free labels.

Be aware though because some unofficial cruelty free labels are misleading, for example Batiste have their own Cruelty Free logo and they do sell to mainland China, allowing for their products to be tested on animals. Therefore they are not Cruelty Free!

 

 

 

The History of Animal Testing in Cosmetics

Testing on animals dates as far back to ancient Greek and Egyptian times. There is documented evidence confirming vivisections being carried out on animals during very early civilisation, it seems that humans have always had a sadistic curiosity.

Animal testing in cosmetics became prevalent during Victorian times. The Victorian times were an age of innovation, a time of groundbreaking discoveries and dramatic scientific changes.

During the Victorian era make up trends were much more natural looking  than that of the Georgian times. A face full of make up signified you were vulgar and were likely to be a prostitute and so the 1800’s were filled with “Beauty” products (if you can call them that), that enhanced “Ladies” natural features. I emphasise “Ladies” because it was believed that the paler the complexion the more beautiful you were considered, as it signified that you were a indeed a lady of nobility that didn’t have to go out and work in the hot sun and therefore were attractive in status.

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Sadly as a result of this skin bleaching became popular, wrinkles were filled in with arsenic and white lead paste. Other beauty trends included mercury and lead being used in eyeshadows, the poison Belladonna was used as drops in the eye to make the pupils dilate, ultimately causing blindness. Dyes so toxic that women would literally die for a hair dye.

The beauty industry in Victorian times were so brutal, products were filled with so many dangerous toxic chemicals it often had women slowly dying of poison from the cosmetics they were putting on their skin and in some cases causing very sudden deaths.

Now one would assume that no one would want to be slowly poisoned or risk dying suddenly just for a beauty product but death for the Victorian’s was no deterrent and the solution was not to stop using dangerous chemicals in the beauty industry the solution was to first test them on innocent animals.

And so animals testing in cosmetics as we know it today began……..